Jun 25, 2015

Treasures Everywhere !

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> During my current visit to my friend Marilyn's home, I came with the plan to help her with some specific projects, organizing, organizing, organizing. Because of these projects I've had to get familiar with closets, cabinets, drawers, the storage room in the garage, the storage in the laundry room, the kitchen cabinets, the refrigerator, etc.
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> Everywhere there are treasures.
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> Everywhere her home speaks to who she is, her life, her life with her husband John, what they did for work, what they did for leisure and fun, books they read, collections saved over the years, the artwork, all the things you can imagine that people surround themselves with during the years of their lives.
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> It's interesting the story that drawers, closets, bookshelves and even refrigerators and freezers can tell about our lives, the people we are, the people we perhaps were and or want to be. Everything at some point has a purpose, a reason for being in our lives. The items, artifacts, tools, appliances, cameras, trophies, photo albums, supplies, they all collaborate weaving the theme of our personalities, our idiosyncrasies, our likes, dislikes, our habits, our passions.
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> While here, I've tried to imagine what my Mother's house would be like if she had lived to her senior senior years like Marilyn. Our house in Barstow, (where we lived when she died in 1974 at the age of 45) was new. My Mom was very organized and efficient so everything had a place, a home, a closet, a drawer. We had the kind of Mom that had a freezer in the garage. She cooked meals in advance, like lasagna, and would freeze for later consumption. We also got meat at a butcher in Barstow, since 5 children were being fed daily, it made sense to get larger quantities from the butcher.
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> I struggle trying to imagine my Mother at 87. I struggle because I did not get to know her as I was older, at an age where I could appreciate her likes, dislikes, her personality, her opinions, you know the things you learn about your parents as the CHILD gets older. Knowing my MOM when I was 10 and 11 and 12 I am sure is significantly different than if I had the opportunity to know her when I was 21, 25, and 30.
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> As of late I've been in a simplify mode back in Atlanta, so being here with Marilyn has continued my focus on what you absolutely have to have versus nice to have, versus OK to sale in the summer neighborhood garage sale, or consign, or donate to Goodwill. At some point most everyone moves, relocates, downsizes, and the consideration of what we keep is an activity that creates an opportunity to renew, to change, to perhaps be more or less of who we are, who we want to be.
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> Certainly during this time there is always the opportunity to confirm the realization that what really matters is inside our heads and hearts. The closets of our invisible psychology, our fears, our dreams, the drawers of our strengths, of our anxieties, the hope and faith in our hearts and minds, that inventory we should care for, nurture, protect, and acknowledge.
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> Sent from my iPad